Justin Rice, Oxide Pottery
Justin Rice, Oxide Pottery


There’s like a human contact with clay, being every civilization has touched clay in some way, so there’s that base desire to keep your hands in clay and form it, and make something from the earth. My father in law bought the building we’re at at auction, kind of when nothing was going on in downtown Lynchburg, but we got to talking to him about renovating that as the studio space and putting a little store front in, so it made much more economic sense to moved to Lynchburg as opposed to trying to get our foothold in Richmond which we were already being priced out of. I feel like it was a place that was like an incubator for all these people that were ready to do something new, and downtown just provided that spot to kind of do it together. Going to art school was like you were always gonna be making something no matter if it was print making or drawing, painting, working on clay. You were always gonna be in the studio. So, it was a real life dedication to studio work. When clay took over, I just, I knew that happened when it was mid-February in the garage, there’s no heat, and I was putting on layers and getting boiling water from inside to keep the water I was dipping my hands in warm enough to keep working. I was like, then I realized I’m kinda, you know I’m, I’ve got that clay enthusiasm. I need to keep going with it. To a certain extent, money isn’t an issue it’s not like I’m making a huge living off of making pots it’s really, it’s a labor of love ultimately. You know to break even and to end up with some handmade pieces at the end, that feels like it’s a success. I’m Justin with Oxide Pottery, and you can find me in downtown Lynchburg, where the makers are.

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